Daniel Cavanagh – Monochrome

11 10 2017

Cover by Danny BranscombeMonochrome is a new solo album from Daniel Cavanagh, following hot on the heels of the latest Anathema album, The Optimist.

The album is described by Cavanagh as having “…a late night, candlelit feeling, evoking the light of dusk as the summer sun sinks below the horizon, setting the scene for thoughts and meditations that many people will relate to.

Album opener The Exorcist ushers in this mood beautifully. Sustained piano notes hang over synth sequences as the arrangement evolves. A close cousin to Are You There?, Cavanagh delivers an emotional vocal. Sometimes the most simple arrangements hit you hardest, and this is most definitely the case with Monochrome.

This Music features Anneke Van Giersbergen as co-vocalist. Sparse lyrics let you focus on the instrumentation, which delivers one of the most joyful, uplifting songs on the album.

Anneke joins Daniel on the beautiful Soho. A slow-building arrangement, this is one of Monochrome‘s strongest performances. Soho could easily have graced any of the recent Anathema albums. The second section of the song has an array of well-crafted reverb and delay treatments on the synth pads that underpin the piano line.

Piano is the lead instrument on Monochrome, and the albums longest track, The Silent Flight Of The Raven Winged Hours, is where the playing really shines. There is a wonderful mixture of piano tones and its clear that the effects and treatments are being ‘played’ as much as the actual instruments. The mostly instrumental The Silent Flight Of The Raven Winged Hours is the most progressive sounding track on the album and at times, feels a little like it could also be drawing inspiration from the post-rock sound of bands such as Mono (particularly Hymn To The Immortal Wind) as much as from the emotional intensity of Talk Talk and Sigur Ros.

The guitar intro of another mostly instrumental track, Dawn draws us back to the classic recent Anathema sound. The violin of Anna Phoebe shines on one of the shorter pieces.

Oceans Of Time builds from its feather-light intro section. Brush drums and organ underpin this soothing, calming piece. Layer upon layer is gently added to the mix as we arrive at the middle section of the song, which is a piece of pure beauty. You can almost feel the tension in the studio as everything is stripped back to the piano and acoustic guitar. Its an intensely moving part of my favourite track on the album.

Artwork by Danny Branscombe

The album closes with Some Dreams Come True. There is magic living in these notes – I’ve always loved the Anathema songs where a motif repeats and slowly mutates, which is what happens with the first part of Some Dreams Come True. Fans of Steve Reich will surely approve. The arrangement builds in the second part, almost reprising the songs that have gone before.

Monochrome feels like it was made for a particular purpose. To calm, reassure and lift your mood. It feels a million miles away from the sort of album you can dip in and out of, in this playlist obsessed, instant gratification era.

So whether you listen to this album on CD, vinyl or via streaming, pop on your best headphones, close your eyes and immerse yourself in this music.

The Exorcist
This Music
Soho
The Silent Flight Of The Raven Winged Hours
Dawn
Oceans Of Time
Some Dreams Come True

Buy Monochrome by Daniel Cavanagh on CD

Buy Monochrome by Daniel Cavanagh on vinyl

Buy The Optimist by Anathema on CD

Buy The Optimist by Anathema on vinyl

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Anathema – The Optimist

11 06 2017

The OptimistThe Optimist is the eleventh album from Liverpool’s Anathema, and a continuation of the story told in 2001’s A Fine Day to Exit album.

I hear shades of current bands such as Archive in The Optimist, and from early on its quite clear that this is a much more electronic offering than recent Anathema albums. The 5.1 mix (by Bruce Soord with Vincent Cavanagh) is enthralling – the electronic beats of Leaving it Behind scatter around the speakers – and the audio narrative that is so important to this album feels much clearer in the 5.1 version.

Endless Ways is a beautiful track – I love the Pink Floyd-esque guitar riff, and the emotive, reverb heavy vocal from Lee Douglas sits really well in the mix.

‘The dream I’m creating’

The albums title track is a standout song. Although the band have made the theme of the album clear, the lyrics on the album are open to interpretation – and suggest a story of someone running away and looking for direction, or maybe salvation. The track The Optimist builds with layers of guitar over strings and piano, and the end section is very moving.

My favourite track on the album is the instrumental San Francisco. The Run like Hell inspired guitar riff runs as a counter-play to the piano arpeggio – and when the hard sequencer riff hits, I’m simply in electronica heaven. Giorgio Moroder would be proud of you Anathema! This track has to be heard through headphones or a 5.1 setup to be really appreciated. There is joy in repetition.

The next stop on the journey is Springfield. The guitar and piano lines (with a sweet separation in the mix) evolve until the wall of guitars hit you so hard it hurts.

‘How did I get here
I don’t belong here’

Ghosts has a wonderful Massive Attack (Teardrops) beat and a lovely string arrangement.

Anathema press session © Scarlet Page

Can’t let go is the most uptempo song on the album, and sounds like a hybrid of Radiohead and Tears for Fears – that’s a good thing by the way. The lead and rhythm guitars are stunning on Can’t let go.

The simple and direct lyrics of Close your eyes match it’s atmospheric and disturbing music, as it mutates into an almost Twin Peaks like jazz arrangement. The album artwork maybe displays another David Lynch (Lost Highway) influence.

‘Close your eyes, just dream on’

Close your eyes flows directly into Wildfires, with its heavily treated vocals and percussion, as the track moves towards its powerful climax. The child’s music-box keyboard and guitar underpin the sad ‘too late’ refrain.

‘Who am I?’

The Optimist closes with a solo voice and guitar performance that comes into focus as the full band kicks in on Back to the start. The most psychedelic track on the album, with Beatles like guitar / strings and uplifting harmonies.

“They don’t understand, cos they don’t talk for me”

The Optimist is a powerful and moving album, that really resonates in these uncertain and troubling times. It is also one of Anathema’s finest albums to date.

Buy The Optimist on CD

Buy The Optimist Vinyl

Buy the Optimist Blu-ray (includes mp3 download)








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